National Assistive Technology Act Data System

Annual Progress Report - Full Report

Virginia 2023

General Information

Statewide AT Program (Information to be listed in national State AT Program Directory)

State AT Program Title:
The Virginia Assistive Technology System
State AT Program Title:
State AT Program URL
www.vats.virginia.gov
Mailing Address:
2001 Maywill Street, Suite 202
City:
Richmond
State:
Va
Zip Code:
23230
Program Email:
barclay.shepard@dars.virginia.gov
Phone:
8046629990
TTY:
8004649950

Lead Agency

Agency Name:
Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services
Mailing Address:
8004 Franklin Farms Drive
City:
Richmond
State:
Va
Zip Code:
23229
Program URL:
https//www.dars.virginia.gov

Implementing Entity

Name of Implementing Agency:
Mailing Address:
City
State:
Zip Code:
Program URL:

Program Director and Other Contacts

Program Director for State AT Program (last, first):
Shepard, Barclay
Title:
Manager
Phone:
8046629990
E-mail:
barclay.shepard@dars.virginia.gov
Program Director at Lead Agency (last, first):
Shepard, Barclay
Title:
Manager
Phone:
8046629990
E-mail:
barclay.shepard@dars.virginia.gov
Primary Contact at Implementing Agency (last, first) - If applicable:
Title:
Phone:
E-mail:

Person Responsible for completing this form if other than Program Director

Name (last, first):
Title:
Phone:
E-mail:

Certifying Representative

Name (last, first):
Hayfield, Kathryn
Title:
DARS Commissioner
Phone:
8046627010
E-mail:
kathryn.hayfield@dars.virginia.gov

State Financing

Did your approved state plan for this reporting period include any State Financing? No
Did your approved state plan for this reporting period include conducting a Financial Loan Program? No

B. State Financing Activities that provide consumers with resources and services that result in the acquisition of AT devices and services

1. Overview of Activities Performed

How many other state financing activities that provide consumers with access to funds for the purchase of AT devices and services were included in your approved state plan? 0


C. State Financing Activities that Allow Consumers to Obtain AT at Reduced Cost

1. Overview of Activities Performed

How many state financing activities that allow consumers to obtain AT at a reduced cost were included in your approved state plan? 0

D. Anecdote

Impact Area

Impact Area

E. Performance Measures

Performance Measures
Response Primary Purpose for Which AT is Needed Total
Education Employment Community Living
1. Could only afford the AT through the AT program. 00 00 00 00
2. AT was only available through the AT program. 00 00 00 00
3. AT was available through other programs, but the system was too complex or the wait time too long. 00 00 00 00
4. Subtotal 00 00 00 00
5. None of the above 00 00 00 00
6. Subtotal 00 00 00 00
7. Nonrespondent 00 00 00 00
8. Total 00 00 00 00
9. Performance on this measure NaN% NaN% NaN%

F. Customer Satisfaction

Satisfaction
Customer Rating of Services Number of Customers Percent
Highly satisfied 00 NaN%
Satisfied 00 NaN%
Satisfied somewhat 00 NaN%
Not at all satisfied 00 NaN%
Nonrespondent 00 NaN%
Total Surveyed 00
Response rate % NaN%

G. Notes:

Reutilization

A. Number of Recipients of Reused Devices

Activity Number of Individuals Receiving a Device from Activity
A. Device Exchange 00
B. Device Refurbish/Repair - Reassign and/or Open Ended Loan 4,553
C. Total 4,553

Performance Measure
D. Excluded from Performance Measure because AT is provided to or on behalf of an entity that has an obligation to provide the AT such as schools under IDEA or VR agencies/clients. 00
E. Number of Individuals Included in Performance Measures 4,553

If a number is reported in D you must provide a description of the reason the individuals are excluded from the performance

B. Device Exchange Activities

Device Exchange
Type of AT Device Number of Devices Exchanged Total Estimated Current Purchase Price Total Price for Which Device(s) Were Exchanged Savings to Consumers
Vision 00 $0 $0 $0
Hearing 00 $0 $0 $0
Speech Communication 00 $0 $0 $0
Learning, Cognition and Developmental 00 $0 $0 $0
Mobility, Seating and Positioning 00 $0 $0 $0
Daily Living 00 $0 $0 $0
Environmental Adaptations 00 $0 $0 $0
Vehicle Modification & Transportation 00 $0 $0 $0
Computers and Related 00 $0 $0 $0
Recreation, Sports and Leisure 00 $0 $0 $0
Total 00 $0 $0 $0

C. Device Refurbish/Repair - Reassignment and/or Open Ended Loan Activities

Device Reassign/Repair/Refurbish and/or OEL
Type of AT Device Number of Devices Reassigned/Refurbished and Repaired Total Estimated Current Purchase Price Total Price for Which Device(s) Were Sold Savings to Consumers
Vision 00 $0 $0 $0
Hearing 00 $0 $0 $0
Speech Communication 00 $0 $0 $0
Learning, Cognition and Developmental 00 $0 $0 $0
Mobility, Seating and Positioning 3,868 $2,789,673 $0 $2,789,673
Daily Living 2,588 $350,235 $0 $350,235
Environmental Adaptations 00 $0 $0 $0
Vehicle Modification & Transportation 00 $0 $0 $0
Computers and Related 00 $0 $0 $0
Recreation, Sports and Leisure 34 $46,442 $0 $46,442
Total 6,490 $3,186,350 $0 $3,186,350

D. Anecdote

VATS contracted children’s durable medical equipment (DME) reuse partner, the Children’s Assistive Technology Service (C.A.T.S.), provided life changing DME to assist a six-year-old before discharge at a local hospital. The child was admitted to the hospital after a sudden, unexpected accident in May in which she had both feet traumatically amputated while riding in the family vehicle. She was airlifted to the hospital where a very talented group of surgeons were able to re-implant her feet. She has multiple restrictions on positioning to ensure that she maintains blood flow to her feet including being positioned with her feet above the level of her heart. This individual and her family faced many issues including how do they get her out of bed for mental, emotional, and physical recovery. The State AT Act Program’s contracted children’s reuse partner was able to provide a Convaid Trekker, a light weight, tilt in space stroller/wheelchair, for positioning issues. Several surgeries later she was able to dangle her feet for brief periods of time but the only place she felt safe to do this was in this stroller. She then progressed to no limit of time with her feet down so now she was ready to roll. The reuse partner provided an additional wheelchair, making it possible for her to head out on her own (with two wound vacs mounted to the wheelchair). As she said, “Now I can do it on my own!” The second day in the w/c she wheeled across the bridge yelling “I’m escaping!!!!” Thirty-five days after entering the hospital she was able to go home with her family under her own power. She still has multiple surgeries to go. The reused medical stroller and wheelchair are allowing this to make follow-up medical appointments, participate in family outings, and socialize wi

Impact Area

E. Performance Measures

Performance Measures
Response Primary Purpose for Which AT is Needed Total
Education Employment Community Living
1. Could only afford the AT through the AT program. 56 08 3,498 3,562
2. AT was only available through the AT program. 40 00 631 671
3. AT was available through other programs, but the system was too complex or the wait time too long. 27 00 293 320
4. Subtotal 123 08 4,422 4,553
5. None of the above 00 00 00 00
6. Subtotal 123 08 4,422 4,553
7. Nonrespondent 00 00 00 00
8. Total 123 08 4,422 4,553
9. Performance on this measure 100% 100% 100%

F. Customer Satisfaction

Satisfaction
Customer Rating of Services Number of Customers Percent
Highly satisfied 4,331 95.12%
Satisfied 209 4.59%
Satisfied somewhat 13 0.29%
Not at all satisfied 00 0%
Nonrespondent 00 0%
Total Surveyed 4,553
Response rate % 100%

G. Notes:

Additional work related anecdote and collaboration with VR.-VATS collaborated with the State’s VR program and VATS’ adult durable medical equipment (DME) reuse partner in order to help a VR client be successful at work. The client used a wheelchair for mobility at home, but also needed to control his work computer using the Bluetooth feature incorporated in the wheelchair controls. The individual was employed in a new job but was having trouble getting his full-sized wheelchair to and from work. He was using a lighter weight wheelchair at work, but this chair did not have Bluetooth. VR staff frequently access VATS DME reuse programs to provide back-up mobility equipment or parts to meet specific client customized needs. VR worked with adult DME reuse staff to find an appropriate wheelchair and then customized the donated wheelchair with used electronic components, making it Bluetooth compatible. The result was an appropriate fitting chair that provided computer access for work.

Device Loan

A. Short-Term Device Loans by Type of Purpose

Loans By Purpose
Primary Purpose of Short-Term Device Loan Number
Assist in decision-making (device trial or evaluation) 71
Serve as loaner during service repair or while waiting for funding 00
Provide an accommodation on a short-term basis for a time-limited event/situation 33
Conduct training, self-education or other professional development activity 00
Total 104

B. Short-Term Device Loan by Type of Borrower

LOANS BY TYPE OF BORROWER
Type of Individual or Entity Number of Device Borrowers
Desicion-making All other Purposes Total
Individuals with Disabilities 61 29 90
Family Members, Guardians, and Authorized Representatives 04 01 05
Representative of Education 01 00 01
Representative of Employment 00 00 00
Representatives of Health, Allied Health, and Rehabilitation 03 00 03
Representatives of Community Living 02 03 05
Representatives of Technology 00 00 00
Total 71 33 104

C. Length of Short-Term Device Loans

Length of Short-Term Device Loan in Days 14

D. Types of Devices Loaned

Types of Devices Loaned
Type of AT Device Number of Devices
Desicion-making All other Purposes Total
Vision 09 00 09
Hearing 02 00 02
Speech Communication 00 00 00
Learning, Cognition and Developmental 67 00 67
Mobility, Seating and Positioning 09 61 70
Daily Living 12 00 12
Environmental Adaptations 00 00 00
Vehicle Modification and Transportation 00 00 00
Computers and Related 60 00 60
Recreation, Sports and Leisure 06 00 06
Total 165 61 226

E. Anecdote

VATS collaborated with a private school that provides specialized instruction to school aged students who have a disability and face academic, physical or social challenges. VATS provided a Sensory Kit, developed with No Wrong Door funding, to address the sensory regulation needs of students with disabilities in academics and in the Career Center/work training programs. The Kit includes moving sand art displays, sensory fidget tubes, rocking chairs, artificial aquariums, weighted lap pads, and therapeutic/robotic pets. The school administrators report that the therapeutic robotic pets have been a huge hit! Students have been taught how to use these pets and other sensory regulation kit items provided by VATS as tools to help with sensory input and coping. One lower school student has been able to use “Woofsters”, the robotic dog, to help him deal with anxiety and stressful situations. In class this student was trying a new task that was outside of his comfort zone. Normally, this would result in shutting down or work refusal. With the introduction of the robotic dog, this student was able to recognize this frustration and request time with “Woofsters.” This has not only helped this student, but others in the classroom that were affected by this student’s outbursts.