National Assistive Technology Act Data System

Annual Progress Report - Full Report

California 2020

General Information

Statewide AT Program (Information to be listed in national State AT Program Directory)

State AT Program Title:
Ability Tools
State AT Program Title:
State AT Program URL
http://www.abilitytools.org/
Mailing Address:
1000 G Street, Suite #100
City:
Sacramento
State:
CA
Zip Code:
95814
Program Email:
info@abilitytools.org
Phone:
916-390-2690
TTY:
800-900-0706 (TTY)

Lead Agency

Agency Name:
Department of Rehabilitation
Mailing Address:
721 Capitol Mall
City:
Sacramento
State:
CA
Zip Code:
95814
Program URL:
http://www.dor.ca.gov/AT/index.html

Implementing Entity

Name of Implementing Agency:
California Foundation for Independent Living Centers
Mailing Address:
1000 G Street, Suite 100
City
Sacramento
State:
CA
Zip Code:
95814
Program URL:
www.abilitytools.org

Program Director and Other Contacts

Program Director for State AT Program (last, first):
Mills, Christina
Title:
Executive Director
Phone:
(916) 390-2690
E-mail:
christina@cfilc.org
Program Director at Lead Agency (last, first):
Sampson, Megan
Title:
IL/AT/TBI Programs Chief
Phone:
(916) 558-5866
E-mail:
megan.sampson@dor.ca.gov
Primary Contact at Implementing Agency (last, first) - If applicable:
Cowdell, Megan
Title:
Deputy Director
Phone:
(916) 737-5348
E-mail:
Megan@cfilc.org

Person Responsible for completing this form if other than Program Director

Name (last, first):
Crowley, Kathrine
Title:
Program Manger
Phone:
(916) 737-5346
E-mail:
Kathrine@cfilc.org

Certifying Representative

Name (last, first):
Xavier, Joe
Title:
Director of CA Dept. of Rehabilitation
Phone:
(916) 558-5800
E-mail:
Joe.Xavier@dor.ca.gov

State Financing

Did your approved state plan for this reporting period include any State Financing? Yes
Did your approved state plan for this reporting period include conducting a Financial Loan Program? Yes

Loan Applications
Area of Residence Total
Metro
RUCC 1-3
Non-Metro
RUCC 4-9
Approved Loan made 00 00 00
Approved Not made 00 00 00
Rejected 01 01 02
Total 01 01 02

2. Income of Applicants to Whom Loans Were Made

Lowest/Highest Incomes
Lowest Income: $0 Highest Income: $0

Average Income
Sum of Incomes Loans Made Average Annual Income
$0 00 $0

Number and Percentage of Loans Made to Applicants by Income Range
Income Ranges Total
$15,000
or Less
$15,001-
$30,000
$30,001-
$45,000
$45,001-
$60,000
$60,001-
$75,000
$75,001
or More
Number of Loans 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
Percentage of Loans 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100%

3. Loan Type

Loan Type
Type of Loan Number of Loans Percentage of loans
Revolving Loans 00 0%
Partnership Loans
Without interest buy-down or loan guarantee 00 0%
With interest buy-down only 00 0%
With loan guarantee only 00 0%
With both interest buy-down and loan guarantee 00 0%
Total 00 100%

Loan Type Summary
Type of Loan Number of Loans Dollar Value of Loans
Revolving Loans 00 $0
Partnership Loans 00 $0
Total 00 $0

4. Interest Rates

Interest Rates
Lowest 0%
Highest 0%

Interest Rate Summary
Sum of Interest Rates Number of Loans Made Average Interest Rate
00 00 0%

Number of Loans Made by Interest Rate
Interest Rate Number of loans
0.0% to 2.0% 00
2.1% to 4.0% 00
4.1% to 6.0% 00
6.1% to 8.0% 00
8.1% - 10.0% 00
10.1%-12.0% 00
12.1%-14.0% 00
14.1% + 00
Total 00

5. Types and Dollar Amounts of AT Financed

Types and Dollar Amounts of AT Financed
Type of AT Number of Devices Financed Dollar Value of Loans
Vision 00 $0
Hearing 00 $0
Speech communication 00 $0
Learning, cognition, and developmental 00 $0
Mobility, seating and positioning 00 $0
Daily living 00 $0
Environmental adaptations 00 $0
Vehicle modification and transportation 00 $0
Computers and related 00 $0
Recreation, sports, and leisure 00 $0
Total 00 $0

6. Defaults

Defaults
Number Loans in default 01
Net loss for loans in default $1,900

B. State Financing Activities that provide consumers with resources and services that result in the acquisition of AT devices and services

1. Overview of Activities Performed

How many other state financing activities that provide consumers with access to funds for the purchase of AT devices and services were included in your approved state plan? 00


C. State Financing Activities that Allow Consumers to Obtain AT at Reduced Cost

1. Overview of Activities Performed

How many state financing activities that allow consumers to obtain AT at a reduced cost were included in your approved state plan? 00

D. Anecdote

There were no approved loans in this Federal Fiscal Year.

Impact Area

There were no approved loans in this Federal Fiscal Year.

Impact Area

E. Performance Measures

Performance Measures
Response Primary Purpose for Which AT is Needed Total
Education Employment Community Living
1. Could only afford the AT through the AT program. 00 00 00 00
2. AT was only available through the AT program. 00 00 00 00
3. AT was available through other programs, but the system was too complex or the wait time too long. 00 00 00 00
4. Subtotal 00 00 00 00
5. None of the above 00 00 00 00
6. Subtotal 00 00 00 00
7. Nonrespondent 00 00 00 00
8. Total 00 00 00 00
9. Performance on this measure NaN% NaN% NaN%

F. Customer Satisfaction

Satisfaction
Customer Rating of Services Number of Customers Percent
Highly satisfied 00 NaN%
Satisfied 00 NaN%
Satisfied somewhat 00 NaN%
Not at all satisfied 00 NaN%
Nonrespondent 00 NaN%
Total Surveyed 00
Response rate % NaN%

G. Notes:

This data reflects the state financing activities of California Foundation for Independent Living Center's Freedomtech Loan program. This program was heavily impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, as a fair amount of inquiries were made by individuals experiencing sudden unemployment. Since unemployment benefits do not count as qualifying income for the Freedomtech Loan program these consumers were provided information and assistance accessing AT services that would meet their needs.

Reutilization

A. Number of Recipients of Reused Devices

Activity Number of Individuals Receiving a Device from Activity
A. Device Exchange 34
B. Device Refurbish/Repair - Reassign and/or Open Ended Loan 722
C. Total 756

Performance Measure
D. Device Exchange - Excluded from Performance Measure 00
E. Reassignment/Refurbishment and Repair and Open Ended Loans - Excluded from Performance Measure because AT is provided to or on behalf of an entity that has an obligation to provide the AT such as schools under IDEA or VR agencies/clients 00
F. Number of Individuals Included in Performance Measures 756

If a number is reported in E you must provide a description of the reason the individuals are excluded from the performance measure:

B. Device Exchange Activities

Device Exchange
Type of AT Device Number of Devices Exchanged Total Estimated Current Purchase Price Total Price for Which Device(s) Were Exchanged Savings to Consumers
Vision 02 $430 $0 $430
Hearing 00 $0 $0 $0
Speech Communication 00 $0 $0 $0
Learning, Cognition and Developmental 00 $0 $0 $0
Mobility, Seating and Positioning 54 $8,260 $40 $8,220
Daily Living 03 $60 $0 $60
Environmental Adaptations 00 $0 $0 $0
Vehicle Modification & Transportation 00 $0 $0 $0
Computers and Related 00 $0 $0 $0
Recreation, Sports and Leisure 00 $0 $0 $0
Total 59 $8,750 $40 $8,710

C. Device Refurbish/Repair - Reassignment and/or Open Ended Loan Activities

Device Reassign/Repair/Refurbish and/or OEL
Type of AT Device Number of Devices Reassigned/Refurbished and Repaired Total Estimated Current Purchase Price Total Price for Which Device(s) Were Sold Savings to Consumers
Vision 31 $8,385 $1 $8,384
Hearing 00 $0 $0 $0
Speech Communication 12 $10,291 $0 $10,291
Learning, Cognition and Developmental 00 $0 $0 $0
Mobility, Seating and Positioning 758 $153,524 $2,582 $150,942
Daily Living 254 $393,195 $20 $393,175
Environmental Adaptations 10 $679 $0 $679
Vehicle Modification & Transportation 00 $0 $0 $0
Computers and Related 43 $13,991 $0 $13,991
Recreation, Sports and Leisure 02 $320 $0 $320
Total 1,110 $580,385 $2,603 $577,782

D. Anecdote

Wally, a man in his 70's, acquired a medical condition that led to several mobility limitations. With the new limitations, including the use of a wheelchair, Wally was no longer able to access or independently live in his home. As a result, Wally was informed he could remain in a rehabilitation facility indefinitely or make several modifications to his home to allow for access and ease of mobility. As his home was only accessible by climbing exterior steps on the porch, Wally’s initial need was an accessible path from his parking area to his front door. As they were unsure of the dimensions of the ramp required, Wally’s friends borrowed a 10-foot portable wheelchair ramp and set it in place. After a few days, it was determined that the 10-foot ramp was too steep of an incline; therefore, it was returned, and a 12-foot portable wheelchair ramp was borrowed instead. The 12-foot ramp was determined to be successful and was made available to Wally for as long as needed. In addition to wheelchair access, one of California's Northern ILC's, FREED Center for Independent Living, improved accessibility inside Wally’s home utilizing its Reuse and Fix It programs. In the end, Wally was provided with floor-to-ceiling transfer poles and a toilet aid so he could accomplish activities of daily living, such as toileting, bathing, and transferring from his wheelchair on his own, which allowed for Wally to return to his own home instead of remaining in a rehabilitation facility. With the assistance of these devices and services through the FREED Center for Independent Living, Wally was able to return home, to live independently with his wife, and avoid significant healthcare costs that would have been incurred with a longer stay in a rehabilitation facility.

A man in a wheelchair, with a woman standing behind him, descending a ramp from a residence.
Impact Area

E. Performance Measures

Performance Measures
Response Primary Purpose for Which AT is Needed Total
Education Employment Community Living
1. Could only afford the AT through the AT program. 10 03 501 514
2. AT was only available through the AT program. 02 00 178 180
3. AT was available through other programs, but the system was too complex or the wait time too long. 00 01 51 52
4. Subtotal 12 04 730 746
5. None of the above 00 00 03 03
6. Subtotal 12 04 733 749
7. Nonrespondent 00 00 07 07
8. Total 12 04 740 756
9. Performance on this measure 100% 100% 98.65%

F. Customer Satisfaction

Satisfaction
Customer Rating of Services Number of Customers Percent
Highly satisfied 333 44.05%
Satisfied 331 43.78%
Satisfied somewhat 05 0.66%
Not at all satisfied 05 0.66%
Nonrespondent 82 10.85%
Total Surveyed 756
Response rate % 89.15%

G. Notes:

The change in section C from last year to this year results from: last year was heavily impacted by wildfires across the state and produced a need for replacement AT and DME, which was met through reuse devices. This is in contrast to this year which, although also heavily impacted by statewide wildfires, reuse AT and DME were not able to be utilized due to consumer concerns regarding COVID-19, the need was met rather by using county, Red Cross and other services that could provide new, rather than reuse items. The following notification occurs when saving: Info! Data was saved with validation warnings: The average retail price of exchange daily living devices is low. Please ensure that retail values are being entered correctly. The retail values have been confirmed - $60 for 2 sock aids and a reacher seems plausible, if not typical.

Device Loan

A. Short-Term Device Loans by Type of Purpose

Loans By Purpose
Primary Purpose of Short-Term Device Loan Number
Assist in decision-making (device trial or evaluation) 680
Serve as loaner during service repair or while waiting for funding 18
Provide an accommodation on a short-term basis for a time-limited event/situation 91
Conduct training, self-education or other professional development activity 22
Total 811

B. Short-Term Device Loan by Type of Borrower

LOANS By Borrower Type
Type of Individual or Entity Number of Device Borrowers
Individuals with Disabilities 555
Family Members, Guardians, and Authorized Representatives 74
Representative of Education 90
Representative of Employment 10
Representatives of Health, Allied Health, and Rehabilitation 53
Representatives of Community Living 11
Representatives of Technology 18
Total 811

C. Length of Short-Term Device Loans

Length of Short-Term Device Loan in Days 30

D. Types of Devices Loaned

Types of Devices Loaned
Type of AT Device Number
Vision 77
Hearing 50
Speech Communication 156
Learning, Cognition and Developmental 45
Mobility, Seating and Positioning 156
Daily Living 93
Environmental Adaptations 42
Vehicle Modification and Transportation 05
Computers and Related 437
Recreation, Sports and Leisure 21
Total 1,082

E. Anecdote

Pui Ling (Amanda) had completed an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) assessment, when her dad, Thomas, reached out to Orange County’s Assistive Technology Exchange Center (ATEC) to obtain information on various methods to access the communication devices they explored during the evaluation. ATEC provided a demonstration/consultation for Amanda, and following the demonstration, ATEC loaned Amanda several access options to try. Kevin Daugherty, Rehabilitation Engineer at ATEC, provided demonstrations and loaned the Jellybean switch, Roller Joystick, Candy Corn Proximity Switch, and Big Red Switch to use with the device trial. After two weeks of utilizing the various devices, Amanda and Thomas were able to confidently choose the right AAC devices, the Roller Joystick and Big Red Switch, for Amanda to comfortably control in her life.